MONTESSORI METHOD

The Montessori Method of education, developed by Dr. Maria Montessori, is a child-centered educational approach based on the scientific observations of children from birth to adulthood. It is a view of the child as one who is naturally eager for knowledge and capable of initiating learning in a supportive, thoughtfully prepared learning environment.

Practical Life

Practical: means basic, useful, purposeful

Life: means the way of living.

Practical life Exercises are just that, they are Exercises so the child can learn how to do living activities in a purposeful way.

The purpose and aim of Practical Life is to help the child gain control in the coordination of his movement, and help the child to gain independence and adapt to his society. Practical Life Exercises also aid the growth and development of the child’s intellect and concentration and will in turn also help the child develop an orderly way of thinking.

Sensorial

The purpose and aim of Sensorial work is for the child to acquire clear, conscious, information and to be able to then make classifications in his environment. The child, to Montessori, is a “sensorial explorer”. Through work with the sensorial materials, the child is given the keys to classifying the things around him, which leads to the child making his own experiences in his environment. Through the classification, the child is also offered the first steps in organizing his intelligence, which then leads to his adapting to his environment. 

Through the child’s work with Sensorial material, the child is helped to make abstractions, he is helped in making distinctions in his environment, and the child is given the knowledge not through word of mouth, but through his own experiences. 

Mathematics

Montessori Math materials build sequentially on previous learning, introduce concrete learning before abstract learning, are self-correcting, and isolate the difficulty being learned. Learning mathematical concepts in a Montessori classroom begins concretely and progresses towards the abstract. 

Language

Phonics are taught before the names of the letters. By learning the 42 sounds, children progress to blending and segmenting exercises where they begin their journey towards reading independently.

Culture

The Cultural area of the Montessori classroom covers a variety of subjects. Geography, Science, Botany, Zoology, and History are included. Art and Music are also part of the Cultural Area of the classroom.